ELEVATE HUB 1

This HUB has all the details you need across the series – nutrition & recovery resources, important dates and more.

It will be updated regularly, so check this page each week for all the info you need as it happens.

WEEK SEVEN…

Who is excited to celebrate their testing wins next week?!

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| NUTRITION FOCUS |

SUPPLEMENTS

Do you need them and which ones are right for you?

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| MOVEMENT & RECOVERY FOCUS |

CONTRAST SHOWERS

Our challengers always seem to loveeeee this recovery technique – check it out…

 

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| IN PREPARATION FOR WEEK 8 |

 

BOOK YOUR FINISH LINE TESTING

TUESDAY 7.30PM & FRIDAY 6AM in WEEK EIGHT.

Let’s check back in on your strength, cardio, mobility or overall fitness goals and celebrate your wins! You will need to book in to one of these sessions in the app – book in to the ELEVATE SESSIONS on Tuesday or Friday.

IT’S REMEASURE TIME

Let’s check back in on your measurements and photos from week one!

Check out the info below and either complete your measurements at home or book on in to complete them in the studio.

WANT TO DO YOUR PHOTOS AND MEASURMENTS AT HOME?

Follow this guide so you can get the most consistent and accurate tracking of your progress….

Click Here

WANT A COACH TO DO YOUR MEASUREMENTS AND PHOTOS?

Book a time to come in and have us do your measurements and photos for you – spaces are limited…

NUTRITION FOCUS

Click each section to check out all the info on the focus of the week…

By examining your food diary, we can identify what we can identify what we classify as your ‘lead domino’ – the first thing we can look to adjust that will create a positive shift in your nutrition habits and mindset.

You might have one obvious thing, or there might be two or three we can look to change. By focusing on adjusting one (or maybe two) things at a time, it makes it much easier and it makes it much more sustainable too. Once you have your first domino of change down pat, we can look to your next domino and take that next jump forward.

The more detail you can record in your diary, the easier it can be to find your LEAD DOMINO.

For example, if you record your hours of sleep, we can piece together patterns if you’re regularly reaching for that sugary snack on days where you’ve had less hours of sleep.

Or, if you seem to under eat on days that you’ve noted stress.

 

Your coach will help you identify what adjustments we can look to make first, but if you have something in mind that you know you want to shift as your first priority, let us know and we’ll be there to help you!

I’m sure we’ve all heard this before – it’s easy to hear this and think that carbs are the bad guy. But to put it simply – we NEED carbohydrates in our diet from several sources to simply function as a human being!

Carbohydrates contain glucose (and many other essential vitamins and minerals), which provides us with a constant supply of energy and is essential for our brain, cells, tissues and organs to function optimally.

When we think about the types of carbohydrates to consume on a daily basis – we want to be having an abundance of those that are slower-digesting and higher in fibre which is going to ensure a slow release of glucose for that sustained energy supply. These sources help us to feel fuller for long, lower your risk of diseases, support your digestive system and boost overall gut health. We get these types of carbohydrates if we choose a wider selection of diverse, whole and less-processed foods such as:
– Fruits and root vegetables
– Wholegrains
– Beans and legumes


Faster-digesting, lower-fibre carbohydrates can be beneficial too, especially when you need a quick energy boost. These include foods such as:
– Fruits
– Fruit Drinks
– Rice Cakes
– White bread or rice

We are all different – and we all require different amounts of carbohydrates.
Our intake is dependant on, but not limited to, the following:
– how active you are
– how intense, long lasting and frequent that activity is
– how much lean mass or body fat you have (or want to have)
– how old you are
– genetics
– intake of other macronutrients
– what foods you like, prefer and are able to tolerate

Check out your recommended intake by visiting this link:
https://www.eatforhealth.gov.au/nutrition-calculators/average-recommended-number-serves-calculator

Tip: Use your hand as a portioning tool! It’s always with you, wherever you go ? And an accurate measuring method each time.

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Firstly, let’s look into energy balance.
We get energy from food and we expend energy to move and stay alive – this fundamental biochemical relationship between our energy in and out is known as energy balance. So….
– if we take in more energy than we use, we gain weight
– if we take in less energy than we use, we lose weight
– if we take in the same energy as we use, our weight stays the same (below)
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Sounds simple right? But, there are many things that affect energy balance. Such as appetite, foods that are consumed, calorie absorption, psychological factors, energy burned at rest, through exercise, non-exercise activity or by metabolising foods.


What we are trying to say here is there is no perfect number and we cannot determine a specific amount of calories/energy that you must be consuming everyday because there are many underlying factors.

What’s important is to ensure that you are eating enough and paying attention to how you are feeling (key point on your food diaries!) so that your body is functioning optimally and making changes according to your goals. Whether that be adjusting energy intake  or energy output; for example getting better sleep so that you have more energy to get physically active, meal prepping so that you are eating enough and getting enough sources of carbohydrates, protein and fats in your meals to keep you satiated and to avoid snacking in the afternoons/evenings on discretionary foods or packing snacks with you when you know you’ve got a busy day at work or on the road.. chances are if you are fatigued and there is a large gap between the timing of your meals your body is alerting you that you need to eat.
This as a whole focuses on a more sustainable approach by changing our behaviours.

Check out this link for an estimate of your daily energy needs:
https://www.eatforhealth.gov.au/eat-health-calculators

Sure, you are going to lose weight if you begin eating less energy (calories) than the amount of energy you are expending..

BUT!

We cannot stress this enough… that focusing on reducing your calorie intake to extreme lows over a long period of time can actually do the opposite effect on your body!!

To keep it simple our total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) has three components:


BMR Basal Metabolic Rate
The energy required to keep your body functioning at rest or simply, to keep you alive!
For example breathing, digesting food, circulation and body temperature control, just to name a few!)


Thermic Effect of Food
The amount of energy required to digest, absorb, transport, metabolise and sore nutrients that we consume – different macronutrients require different amount of energy to process.


Physical Activity Expenditure
The amount of energy we burn each day and through physical activity (any work done beyond our BMR) such as sitting, walking, running, jogging or your peachi training sesh????

(This is where your calculations from last week’s link for daily energy needs come in handy – if you missed it visit https://www.eatforhealth.gov.au/eat-health-calculators)

 

Now… if you have a sudden drop in energy/calorie intake (also known as a ‘crash diet’) or consume under your TDEE over a long period of time this results in a decrease in metabolic rate where your metabolism starts to slow down with other side effects such as dehydration, weakness and fatigue while our hormones that regulate appetite, hunger and satiety rise significantly and cravings rise.

This dieting cycle of restricting food leads to increased feelings of deprivation, increases the desire to eat and causes cravings for certain foods, especially because diets tend to exclude major food groups (which we learned last week – our body needs to survive!)

And as you act on these intense cravings, the chances are that you will over-consume and binge eat, which leads to weight gain and begins to increase negative feelings about yourself (guilt and shame) because the perception is that you have ‘failed’ your diet and will most likely lead you into the cycle below.

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In conclusion, chances are that your ‘diet’ is going to be reversed. So, lose weight quickly while starving, only to gain most of it back (or more) and feel much hungrier than when you started, or, lose weight slowly, for good, adapt improved eating habits, implementing regular physical activity and FEEL BETTER overall – which one would you choose?

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Follow this link to identify your daily serves of each food group:

https://www.eatforhealth.gov.au/nutrition-calculators/average-recommended-number-serves-calculator

In conjunction with this, it’s beneficial to limit intake of foods that contain saturated fat, added salt, sugar and alcohol.


*Did you know: once alcohol is consumed, our body makes it a priority to metabolize it – which means it will stop metabolizing anything else in order to take care of alcohol right away – as there is no where to store alcohol in our bodies. Therefore, anything else you are eating won’t metabolize as well.

Food preparation is one of the most important components when it comes to creating healthy and consistent nutrition habits. But sometimes the idea of Meal Prepping can be a little overwhelming – either you have no idea where to start or the process can be so monstrous you just want to hide from it!  

So this week is all about how to manage your meal preparation so it becomes a regular practice, making your food choices healthier and more consistent week in and week out.

2 STEPS TO LEVEL UP YOUR MEAL PREP GAME PLAN:

1. Allocate time in your schedule
Each week it is super important to allocate time into your schedule to get those meals and snacks prepared for the week ahead. Try to be consistent and prepare your meals on the same day each week so it becomes part of your regular routine.

Consider the following:
???? What are your busiest days of the week?

When you’re most stressed and most likely to resort to ordering uber eats, or raid the pantry for some unhealthy snacks that fill those cravings instantly. These are the days where it is most important to have those pre-made nourishing, easily prepared meals sitting in your fridge to turn to when your feeling of stress, fatigue and tiredness kick in so you don’t have to feel so tempted to make those unhealthy choices because the healthy option is easier!


????What suits your schedule, or feels more manageable for you?

You can allocate one larger chunk of time to do everything in one go from deciding what to make to finishing the cooking, or allocate multiple smaller blocks of time for each component of meal prepping (see step 2 for a breakdown).

eg.. “I will do my grocery shop and then I am going to allocate 1 hour to prepare my meals” this is called a habit stack. Identify a habit that you already do (grocery shop) then stack your new behaviour on top (meal prep for one hour) this is an effective strategy to increase your likelihood of changing behaviours.

 

2, Break Down the Tasks
Successful food preparations can be broken down into 4 components:

1. Deciding what to make
Find that new recipe you wanted to try and decide what you want to have in the fridge waiting for you. When deciding what you will cook ensure you think about how much time it will take (ie. how complicated your recipes are) and how balanced your choices are – try to have a good mix of vegetables, carbohydrate and protein sources across your week so you’re getting lots of variety and your body is getting a good mix of nutrients.

2. Make your shopping list
Who doesn’t love a well prepared and organised list?!

3. Go food shopping and stick to your list
Tick those items off as you go to ensure you have everything you need.


4. Cooking time
Cooking all of your meals at once can help you save lots of time and lots of extra dishes!
Make it fun – put some music on and get dancing! Get the family involved in the process and teach them some simple, fun & interesting cooking skills

Hot tip: when making your shopping list, consider shopping for seasonal produce. Seasonal produce is picked at its peak growing time, this means you’re really going to be getting great quality. It will be extremely fresh, tastier and more nutrient dense while chances are it will last longer in your fridge too!
It’s also a bang for your buck! When particular produce is in season, there is an abundance of supply from our farmers which means prices are on the cheaper side ????????

Check out what’s in season here http://seasonalfoodguide.com/

When we lift weights and eat protein we can fall into the fear that we’re going to start looking like a body builder – those lean athletes with massive muscles like Arnold Schwarzenegger who get their guns out on stage in a tiny mankini!

The truth is that behind these bulging biceps and shredded abs, there is an IMMENSE amount of science, dedication and hard work over many years of intense training and strict nutrition to achieve this look (in many cases steroids play a large part too).

For females it takes another level of intense (and we mean INTENSE) dedication to actually become what we consider as ‘bulky’ compared to males too, because females have lower levels of testosterone and human growth hormone (the key hormones involved in the muscle building process). 

So, when you join a gym and start lifting weights while also focusing on better nutrition (which will most likely include introducing more protein) your chances of looking ‘bulky’ as a result is quite slim, especially if we are in a caloric deficit. In fact, it is scientifically IMPOSSIBLE to build bigger muscle mass while eating in a calorie deficit. 

To build up you’d need to be focusing on a strict diet, training 5+ days per week in an intense weight program and eating in a calorie surplus.

So if you’re not doing all those things, but you do notice more muscle or feeling more ‘firm’ after getting into weight training and/or eating more protein, this is likely due to fat loss – the layers of fat that have been covering your muscles before are shredding away, leaving the feeling and look of more firm muscles behind. And that’s what most of us with fat loss goals WANT, right?


It’s great to shift our focus – what are the positive effects of lifting weights and eating more protein? Well let us tell you! ????


As a result of weight training you’re going to:
~ improve your muscular strength, which further protects your joints from injury
~ reduce loss of muscle mass, which is important as we age
~ improve physical function, balance, mobility and flexibility
~ improve your sense of wellbeing – boosts in self confidence, body image and mood
~ prevention or control of chronic conditions and pain management


While consuming your recommended amounts of protein will:
~ aid in the increase of your muscle mass and strength
~ keep your feeling fuller for longer and satisfied after your meals, which helps reduce those late night snack cravings
~ keeps our cells healthy and helps to fight off infections

So.. enjoy your strength training for improved health and enjoy a protein-carbohydrate rich meals after training to replace your energy stores, aid with repair and maintain muscle mass ????

We promise you won’t start bursting out of your tops like the Hulk any time soon!

 “Detoxing and going on a juice cleanse will help my body reset”

It’s simple. No.

Our bodies naturally detoxify themselves and get rid of waste, all thanks to our vital organs like our lungs, skin, kidneys and liver. It’s what keeps us alive!

Juice cleanses severely decrease your intake of energy, which we outlined in “if I eat less I’ll lose weight” is NOT sustainable – as soon as you finish your juice cleanse you’ll be hungrier and your likelihood of overeating increases!!

They claim to heal and reset your gut – which has no scientific evidence, by the way… but the foods we are required to eat for good health does this for our gut microbiome..

Can you see the trend here?

You can assist with these processes yourself by eating an abundance of nutrients from a variety of whole foods, reducing your alcohol intake, reducing your intake of processed foods that are high in saturated fats, sugar and sodium, consistently getting your body moving through various types of physical activity, creating a good sleep routine and keeping well hydrated with healthy fluids…

Without giving in to silly diet trends with bold claims 🙂

Importance of Hydration
Water is essential. Every cell, tissue and organ in our bodies needs water so that our bodily functions and processes are able to take place such as:
– Maintaining our core body temperature
– Keeping our joints lubricated and protected
– Digesting food while absorbing and transferring nutrients
– Getting rid of waste products.

Our body weight is made up of 50-80% of water (dependent on lean body mass) so when we are at risk of becoming dehydrated it’s important to up your water game! We lose water through sweat, especially during physical activity or when we are under heat stress, breathing and urination.

 

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Signs of dehydration include:
– Increased thirst
– Headaches
– Dark coloured urine
– Irritability
– Dry mouth, tongue and skin
– Feeling light headed or faint
– Feeling really tired.

We need a constant intake of water throughout the day to ensure that we are balancing out these hydration levels and avoiding dehydration.


 

 

 

 

 

How much water should I be consuming?
As a baseline, without taking into considerations the various factors of water loss such as physical activity, it is recommended for:

Men to consume about 10 cups per day (2.6L) and
Women to consume about 8 cups per day (2.1L)


How Can I Stay Hydrated?
It’s recommended to drink even before you feel thirsty so that you have a consistent intake. Some tops tips are to:
– Keep a water bottle with you all day, wherever you are
– Create a routine, this could be having a glass of water as soon as you wake up in the morning or having a glass of water before every meal/snack
– Track your water intake
– Keep chilled water in the fridge for those really hot days or use an insulated water bottle to keep that water nice and crispy fresh
– If you don’t enjoy tap water, add some flavouring or fresh fruits such as lemon or strawberries to make it more enjoyable and increase your likelihood of consuming more water.

Just like protein and carbs are essential to our diets, so are fats!

In the 1980’s and 1990’s there was a ‘low-fat’ craze and fat (especially saturated fat) became the public health #1 enemy… but it was found that people who were overly focused in ‘low-fat’ products ended up eating a-lot more processed foods, focused on ‘badness’ of a particular nutrient rather than eating high-quality delicious food mindfully, felt less satiated with their meals and ended up eating more overall, ate more foods with processed sugars and salt to make up for missing fat and focused on the nutrient itself rather than their broad diet as a whole.

Dietary fat has a variety of roles within our bodies:
– Provides us with energy and nutrients (fats are the most energy-dense macronutrient)
– Helps us make and balance hormones
– Support our cell structure and growth
– Protects our vital organs, our brain and nervous system while aiding their function
– Helps the transportation of vitamins

We thrive best when we have a variety of fat types that occur naturally in different types of foods. Some fats are healthier than others.

The four main types of fats are:
Saturated (found in beef, pork, lamb, eggs, full-fat dairy, coconuts and cocoa. They are also found in manufactured and packaged foods)


Polyunsaturated (includes omega 3 and omega 6 fatty acids – having a balance of both is essential to our diets. Found in foods such as marine life, nuts and seeds and various plants)


Monounsaturated (found in olive, peanut and canola oils, avocados, nuts and seeds)


Trans (present in processed foods such as baked goods, processed meats, fried and takeaway foods. These are recommended to be reduced and/or avoided as they increase the level of ‘bad’ cholesterol in our bodies and lower the level of ‘good’ cholesterol. They increase inflammation in the body which increases our risk of heart disease)


In short…

Rather than focusing on labelling something as ‘bad’ – always look at the bigger picture. Look at how we eat, why we eat, where we eat and with who we are eating with. Eat a wide selection of diverse, whole, less-processed food sources to support your body’s function whilst minimising or eliminating refined and processed foods containing industrially produced fats.

There are many ways that we can use the timing of our meals to our advantage.

Before Training:
You can really get the most out of your training sessions by the food you eat and how hydrated you are. It is recommended to eat roughly 1-2 hours before training with a focus on consuming a meal or snack that is rich in carbohydrates and easy to digest.

For example:
– raisin toast with jam
– crumpets with banana and honey
– bowl or cereal with chopped fruit and yoghurt
– fruit smoothie


After Training
It’s important to appropriately rehydrate and refuel the body after a training session. It’s recommended to eat within the first 60-90 minutes after your session  – with a focus on including rich carbohydrates and lean protein to replenish muscle fuels stores and promote muscle repair and growth

For example:
– lean meat and salad roll
– pasta with bolognese sauce
– fruit and muesli with greek yoghurt
– tuna on crackers with a piece of fruit

 

 (before and after training nutrition will vary depending on the timing and intensity of your session)


Breakfast time
Eating breakfast improves your energy levels, concentration, metabolism and reduces your likelihood of over consuming foods of high energy later in the day. Set your alarm for 10-15 minutes earlier so that you can fit in breakfast, if you have a morning commute take a prepared meal with you for the journey or keep your breakfast options in the work fridge so that they are there upon your arrival. Aim for a source of protein and rich in carbohydrates to give you that energy and keep you satiated afterwards.

For example:
– wholemeal toast with avocado, tomato and boiled eggs
– porridge with fresh fruits
– muesli with fresh fruit and yoghurt

Throughout the day
When you are eating consistently you will have a consistent supply of energy.
It’s important to begin to identify your hunger cues and how you are feeling in these moments so that you are giving your body what it needs.

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Eating Slowly
This habit can help you to become more aware of your choices, calibrate your physiological hunger and fullness cues while increasing satisfaction with your meals. When we’re rushed, stressed or too busy we rarely take the time to savour our food or sometimes even chew it properly – our digestion suffers and it increases chances of over-eating.


– Sit down in a calm environment with minimal distractions
– Put down your utensils in-between bites
– Set aside time to eat
– If you find yourself rushing, that’s OK – put your utensils down and re-focus.

Also known as fad diets. UGH! 🚩🚩

ELEVATE HUB 8Did you know that if you are told to completely cut out certain foods and/or food groups from your diet, you’re actually going to crave them more? Because these restrictions lead to cravings, overeating and increases your likelihood of binge eating, developing an unhealthy relationship with food and becoming deficient in the many of the essential vitamins and minerals that we are required to consume due to restriction and deprivation.


On that, let’s talk about nutrient density and its importance:

We can break this down into two main groups:
higher in energy/calories, fewer nutrients = low nutrient density

higher in nutrients, fewer calories/energy = high nutrient density

Low nutrient dense foods are those that are processed, higher in saturated/trans fats, sodium and sugars. 

Higher nutrient dense foods are those higher in fibre, nutrients, antioxidants, vitamins & minerals.

It’s beneficial to eat a variety of food sources that are of a high nutrient density as they are going to supply us with many essential nutrients that our bodies need for long-lasting energy and health. This is going to support you in feeling better, performing better and generally being your best self!

This is not to say you should never eat a packet of chips or enjoy a pizza (pineapple on pizza anyone? ) because these foods are also delicious and bring us so much joy!

It’s more about highlighting a focus on your overall eating patterns by becoming aware of your food choices and finding your balance. What foods make you feel good, and what don’t? Build your own personal menu of foods that work best for you. Sustainability is key!

ELEVATE HUB 9Have you ever seen those ads on social media promoting a ‘break-through’ supplement promising a healed irritated gut, fresher looking skin, boosted energy levels, peak muscle gains, rapid weight loss, better sleep AND a boosted immunity system? Same. Have you ever fallen for them and eventually realised it was a load of bulls***?! Same! The vitamin industry is a billion dollar business and unfortunately companies use the boldest of claims just to get people to buy their products.. Please remember that vitamin pills are not miracle cures.

Now I do believe that supplements can assist in reaching health-related goals, however the best way possible to get all of the nutrients you need is by eating a well balanced diet. In saying that, everybody is different and some people may not be able to meet their daily requirements through diet alone.


You may need to take supplements if:

🥑 You are pregnant or breastfeeding

🥑 You are elderly, and aren’t getting enough nutrition from the food you eat (malnutrition)

🥑You have a health condition that means your body cannot absorb the nutrients it needs (for example, if you have chronic kidney disease and are on dialysis)

🥑 You have a strong need for a particular nutrient (for example, if you are at risk of osteoporosis and need more calcium)

🥑 You have a restricted diet (for example, if you don’t eat meat and aren’t getting enough iron)

🥑 You have a nutritional deficiency (for example, a blood test shows you have a vitamin D deficiency)

So, before you jump online to find a super pill or head down that aisle in the supermarket – reflect on your dietary patterns first. If you’re eating a well balanced and varied diet chances are that you are getting enough of each nutrient.

Something that we commonly hear is that someone wants to ‘tone’ their tummy, thighs or arms – which simply means they want to lose fat in that specific area.

Ahhhh if only it were that easy!!

Sorry to burst your bubble but when it comes to fat loss, we simply cannot target a specific area or control what area of our body loses fat from first.

BUT you can achieve these results by targeting overall fat loss and maintaining muscle mass through consistent physical activity like resistance training and high-intensity aerobic exercise along with eating a well balanced and varied diet.

MOVEMENT & RECOVERY FOCUS

Click each section to check out all the info on the focus of the week…

As part of this series you have access to a use our Sauna Sanctuary for a sauna session each week. But just how does it work and what are the benefits?

How does an Infrared Sauna work?
Infrared saunas heat the body by mimicking the sun. They emit infrared heat to warm up your body directly (rather than heating the air around you), meaning your body temperature is increases from the inside out.

Infrared vs. Traditional Steam Saunas
A dry infrared sauna operates differently, producing a therapeutic effect via the infrared waves generated from the heating element, all without the heat and humidity of a steam (Finnish) unit.

Infrared sauna temperatures usually range from 40 degrees to 60 degrees Celsius (much lower than a traditional Finnish sauna). You’ll still produce plenty of cleansing perspiration, but without the discomfort of the oppressive external heat of the steam.

Scientifically, it has been proven that an infrared sauna produces sweat comprised of 80% water and 20% toxins, while the traditional Finnish (steam) sauna produces sweat consisting of 97% water and just 3% toxins. When weighing the detoxifying benefits, there is no comparison – the infrared unit wins every time!

What are some benefits of sauna therapy?
There are many psychological and physiological benefits associated with consistent (and even first time) sauna therapy:

> Increased blood flow and oxygen to tissues, promoting accelerated muscle recovery.

> Decreased pain and joint stiffness, with studies showing benefit for those with rheumatoid arthritis or ankylosing spondylitis too.

> Improved relaxation and sleep quality.

> Improved heat tolerance.

> Improvements in depression, anxiety, chronic fatigue and hayfever bouts.

> Reduced risk of dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, sudden cardiac death and of all-cause mortality.

> During sauna therapy it is even believed that due to a release of endorphins and opioid-like peptides, you have increased feelings of pleasure and well-being as your body is flooded with feel-good hormones.

 

Not to mention…

Aside from all the amazing benefits we just listed, one of the key reasons we are so excited to have our Sauna Sanctuary is that it will help our Peachi People take time out from their busy schedules to just be still and have some “me time” – to be forced into mindfulness and relaxation to help with stress reduction and “fill your cup”.

It really is the ultimate me-time where you can focus on yourself and allow your body some down time whilst reaping many wonderful physiological effects!

SOME IMPORTANT TIPS…

What do I need to bring?

Aside from your water bottle, we provide you with a towel, so all you need to bring is comfortable clothes you’re ready to sweat in – bathers, activewear, board shorts, whatever you like really!

You might like to bring your phone and headphones too you can tune out the world and relax!

When do I sauna?

You can sauna directly after a training session or on it’s own as a session too, but we highly recommend you don’t sauna before exercise.

We have a range of times available to book from 6.30am all the way to 7.30pm on weekdays, as well as appointments available on Saturday mornings too.

Do I stay in the sauna for the full 45-minutes?

You have the room for 45-minutes (including time to get changed) but you don’t have to stay in the sauna for the whole time if it feels like it’s a bit too much to begin with – you can come in and out of the sauna, relax in the space and do whatever feels right for you!

What about shower facilities?

Recommendations say that if you take a hot shower before you sauna you will reach a hotter body temperature faster to reap more benefits. You’re welcome to shower at the studio pre and post sauna (we have towels, shampoo etc, hairdryer – everything you need), but you don’t have to shower at the studio if you’d rather head home, we even have cold wet towels to refresh you as you exit the sauna!

Important things to note:

If you haven’t done sauna therapy before or consistently you may find that you feel some of the following effects:

> Claustrophobia

> Fluid loss

> Frequent urination

> Fainting

> Low blood pressure/Light headedness

> Mild heat discomfort

Are you getting your recommended 7-8 hours a night of sleep? If you’re not, then you could be sabotaging yourself greatly!

Getting the recommended hours of sleep leads to:

• Increased motivation and concentration, so you’ll want to hop out of bed and head to Peachi at 6am or after work.

• Increased recovery and decreased risk of injury, meaning you can progress in your training goals.

• Increased strength, power, endurance allowing you to push yourself and go hard in your training.

• Immune promoting genes being switched on and inflammation promoting genes being switched off, so your body will be fighting fit and ready for whatever challenges you want to try.

Do I hear you say “yeah that’s all good I know the theory, but how do I actually get better sleep”?

Well… you come to Peachi and train so try and think of good sleep requiring training to get strong just like our muscles do!

 

Here a few key factors that you can tinker with:

• Light and temperature dictate sleep, so turn on the aircon or do whatever else will help you be stay cool and invest in a sleep mask to keep the glorious sun from prematurely waking you up.

• Routine and consistency need to be developed so your body gets into a rhythm of when it’s time to produce hormones signalling sleep time. Having a bedtime routine will separate the day from the night, clear your mind and body of the day’s stresses, and relax into sleep. Your routine might include a tea (caffeine-free), a shower, some mindful breathing, reading.

• Your night time nutrition also play a role in how restfully you sleep. Sugar and alcohol can have a really big impact on your sleep quality, so minimise late night desserts/snacks and drinking alcohol can have a profound affect on how deep you sleep.

We’ve all heard the buzz term HIIT, but what does it actually mean and how do we ‘hit’ the target when it comes to HIIT? 😛

HIIT stands for High Intensity Interval Training. It has been hyped as the best way to lose fat and gain fitness, and involves repeating a period of high intensity exercise with a set rest period.

There are multiple factors to ensure we’re actually reaping the benefits of HIIT:

1) This may sound obvious, but in order for HIIT to be effective we actually have to be working at a HIGH INTENSITY. We’re not talking ‘kind of pushing, using a semi-challenging weight, I’m a bit puffed’ kind of vibes, we’re talking pushing the pace to the absolute limit, choosing a weight you find a real challenge and being absolutely GASSED at the end of the interval!!

If you’re supposed to be going all out and clocking up as many cardio calories as you can in 30 seconds, you should be hitting it hard and struggling to get through those last few seconds, leaving nothing on the table in the first interval. If you’re going through the motions at about 80% when you’re supposed to be sprinting, you’re missing the point and missing the benefits. 

 

2) For HIIT to be effective you need to actually stick to the assigned REST INTERVAL. The rest time is allocated with purpose:

> If the rest period is long – it can sometimes be equal to the working interval or even longer than the working interval – then it’s there to let the body recover (heart rate down and oxygen back in the muscles) so you’re ready to start the next interval with the same intensity as you the first.

> If the rest period is short then the goal is to limit your recovery time so you’re training your body to be able to push intensity when it’s already fatigued. 

 

So if we haven’t got point 1 above right, then it’s throwing off what our body is doing in point 2.

If you ever look at a session plan or go through a session plan thinking the rest intervals are too long or the session is too easy, we promise you.. you’re doing it wrong!

If you find yourself in this position then there are two ways you can make improvements: 

1) Up the weights or difficulty. Count your reps and try to get an extra rep in every set so you’re really pushing your pace, or if you always use a 9kg Medball for Slams, grab a 12kg and challenge yourself with a heavier weight instead.

2) Work to push through your plateau. HIIT is very much a mental battle when done well – your body is telling you to stop or slow down, but we need to push through that barrier and the burn even when we don’t think we can (because trust us, you can always find that extra 2%). Set yourself a target and be relentless – leave everything on the table!!

Contrast showers is the alternating of cold and warm water whilst in the shower. Having your body to adapt to sudden changes in temperature is highly stimulating as it requires a lot of circulatory and metabolic action that can provide huge benefits to the body!

How?
Well… the warm water causes vasodilation allowing more blood to flow through your veins and cold water causes vasoconstriction allowing less blood to flow.

Due to these changes in vein dilation your circulatory system gets stronger and reduces the chance of circulatory diseases developing. Increased circulation also assists with the transport of nutrients around your body, the removal of toxins and delivery of oxygen.

As cold water reduces blood flow it also reduces inflammation assisting in the reduced occurrence of muscle soreness.

Cold water showers has been shown to increase activity of natural killer cells and leukocytes that help with fighting pathogens thus boosting immunity.

So… how do you get started?

Start off small with 20-30 seconds of cold water at a time increasing to a 1 minute over a few days or weeks. Depending on the season you might go full cold or have a little bit of water and just feel colder than with your ideal temperature on. Then alternate between your hot and cold temperatures.

Try this:
1 min warm/hot water  +  30 sec cold water

x 5 – 10

Make sure to not hold your breathe and that you breathe through it and try to be as relaxed as possible. AND Also always finish with cold water. 

THE BREAKDOWN

Here’s what’s coming your way over the next 8 weeks… get your diaries out ?

ELEVATE HUB 10ELEVATE HUB 11

FACTS, TIPS AND TRICKS

NUTRITION & NOURISHMENT

Food & wellbeing tips from our nutritionist, Emily.

The Facts about Fat…

Why are trans fats bad for you, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats good for you, and saturated fats somewhere in-between? For years, fat was a four-letter word. We were urged to banish it from our diets whenever possible. We switched to low-fat foods. But the shift didn’t make us healthier, probably because we cut back on healthy fats as well as harmful ones.

Fats play a vital role in your nutrition and health by:

?Helping you absorb vitamins A, D, E and K.

?Increasing satiety ― that feeling of being full and satisfied so you don’t over eat.

?Reducing the glycemic impact of a meal or snack so your blood sugar doesn’t spike and lead to a crash (and feeling tired) when it falls.

 

Monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats are known as the “good fats” because they are good for your heart, your cholesterol, and your overall health. These fats can help to:

?Lower the risk of heart disease and stroke.

?Lower bad LDL cholesterol levels, while increasing good HDL.

?Prevent abnormal heart rhythms.

?Lower triglycerides associated with heart disease and fight inflammation.

?Lower blood pressure.

?Prevent atherosclerosis (hardening and narrowing of the arteries).

 

Now it’s trans fats we need to be careful of. Trans fats are found in two forms — natural, which occur in some animal products and aren’t considered harmful, and artificial, which are hydrogenated vegetable oils and have serious health consequences.

Although ruminant (natural) trans fats from animal products are considered safe in moderate amounts, artificial ones are strongly associated with health problems, including heart disease.

Artificial trans fats are likewise linked to long-term inflammation, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, especially for people with obesity or excess weight.

In summary, choose wisely and don’t forget to eat the fats!

The Truth About Carbohydrates

Regardless of their origin, all carbs are broken down in the body into a simple sugar in the body. These are most commonly glucose, fructose (from fruit) and galactose (from dairy).

Certain parts of the carbohydrate (such as starch and fibre), slow the release of sugar into the bloodstream, increase satiety, improve gut flora (by acting as a prebiotic) and regulate bowel motions.

While starch is broken down by the body to simple sugars, fibre passes through relatively undigested. The fact that fibre is not broken down does not void its importance in the human diet as it benefits bowel motions, gut flora and satiety dramatically.

Carbohydrates have three fundamental roles in the human body, they:

? Provide the body with an immediate fuel supply

? Provide the body with stored energy

? Assist with digestive health and disease prevention.

 

After your training sessions, remember to eat your carbohydrates!

Carbs are essential when you start any strength training program to build muscle, fuel your body and help you recover!

‘Cheat Meals’ or, how I prefer to define them, Replenishment Meals – Are they useful?

Shortly after training you have a considerable increase in insulin sensitivity, which means your body is far more effective at driving carbs into the muscle. This normally lasts for around 4-6 hours; however, it’s drastically increased for the first 60 minutes. So, if time permits, aiming to consume your replenishment meal within the first 60 or at least, the first 6 hours should be a goal. In research, they’ve seen glycogen replenishment be over 25% higher within this window. As long as you are following 80 to 90 percent of your diet plan, you can include 1-2 replenishment meals per week to stay sane.

The bottom line – A replenishment meal is exactly that: a meal. A replenishment meal does not constitute a whole day of “cheating”. If you follow the 80/20 rule, then the 10 to 20 percent spent replenishing will never derail you from losing body fat.

Do I need supplements?

I admit, I too have fallen victim to savvy marketing, believing I needed pills and potions for fat loss, healthy skin, muscle building, sleep, energy, concentration, digestion, immunity etc … etc …

I do believe that supplements do play a role in assisting and individual with achieving their health related goals, however, the best way to get all the nutrients you need is to eat a balanced diet.

Studies show that many people who take supplements are actually getting enough nutrients from their diet already. In fact, most people who take supplements don’t need them. There are, however, some people who find it hard to get the nutrients they need through diet alone.

You might need to take a supplement if:

❤️ You are pregnant or breastfeeding
❤️ You are elderly, and aren’t getting enough nutrition from the food you eat (malnutrition)
❤️You have a health condition that means your body cannot absorb the nutrients it needs (for example, if you have chronic kidney disease and are on dialysis)
❤️ You have a strong need for a particular nutrient (for example, if you are at risk of osteoporosis and need more calcium)
❤️ You have a restricted diet (for example, if you don’t eat meat and aren’t getting enough iron)
❤️ You have a nutritional deficiency (for example, a blood test shows you have a vitamin D deficiency)

Before you head to the supplements aisle or jump online, it’s wise to look at your diet. If you’re eating a balanced and varied diet, you’re probably getting enough of each nutrient – and importantly, you’ll be getting them in the right amounts.

Blood Breakdown

When starting any program to improve health and wellbeing, the physical transformation is quite obvious and simple to measure and track progress ie: scans, weight on scales, cm lost etc. But if you really want to pay attention to your transformation more holistically, visit your local GP for and request a full blood examination – you may be suprised at the results you can achieve in a short period of time.

Recent bloodwork can also help identify nutritional deficiencies, so whilst you are paying close attention to your nutrition you could potentially focus on including certain foods if in fact a deficiency is identified! ?

The majority of tests should be bulk billed. Vitamin D is not. But with 32% of the population deficient in Vitamin D and another 30% close to being deficient, it’s one Vitamin we could all benefit from potentially supplementing. And remember, the body needs vitamin D to absorb calcium too ? ?

If possible, request:

  • FBC Protein and Platelets
  • Iron Studies, Vitamin D, B12 and Zinc
  • Thyroid Panel (TSH T3 and T4)

Holistic Wellbeing

When we think of wellness, we tend to think of physical health. We often need to be reminded or, remind ourselves, that your wellbeing is about you as a whole individual, not just your physical health status.

If we commit to improving our overall wellbeing, let’s focus on:

Physical wellbeing

Economic wellbeing

Social wellbeing

Development and activity

Emotional wellbeing

Psychological wellbeing

Life satisfaction

Domain specific satisfaction

Engaging activities and work

 

For further clarity on the importance of social, emotional and spiritual wellbeing, check out: https://5waystowellbeing.org.au/about-wellbeing/

Social Wellbeing is a sense of belonging to a community and making a contribution to society.

Emotional Wellbeing means feeling good. Being happy, experiencing positive emotions like love, joy or compassion, and feeling generally satisfied with life.

Spiritual Wellbeing can include feeling connected to a higher power, a sense of meaning or purpose or feelings of peace or transcendence.

 

When was the last time you assessed your overall wellbeing?

RECOVER & RESTORE

All things muscle, injury, training and strength building…

We’ll let you in on a secret…

Muscles aren’t built in the gym, they’re built in Recovery!

When you’re training, you’re straining! Training causing microtears in the muscles, creating a build-up of waste products, losing fluids and depleting your energy stores.

The process of repair occurs hours after you have trained and left Peachi for the day.

• During and post-training, acids that accumulate in the muscle are removed and pH and intramuscular blood flow delivery oxygen is restored.

• Fluid we have lost to sweat, and breathing is replenished and allows the delivery of nutrients through the bloodstream.

• Hours after training muscle protein synthesis increases repairing the microtears allowing the fibers to heal and become stronger.

• Carbs that you have consumed are converted to energy and stored in the muscle. Protein that you have consumed are then used to repair and rebuild muscle as well as other cells and tissues.

 

This gives you permission to REST. You don’t have to lift weights every single day – nor should you! Having rest days is important to allow your body time to recover and build itself back up in preparation for your next Peachi session.

Check out a few recovery techniques in this section to help your body repair even better.

Breathing seems like the most natural thing to do in the world but do we ever focus on our breathing and what it benefits it may give us?

Mindful breathing is essential focusing attention on your breathing and its natural rhythm and how it feels. Over time this can develop into breathing exercise that are more intentionally and focused on specific rhythms.

Benefits of mindful breathing include:

• Reduced heart rate and reduced stress on your cardiovascular system

• Decreased cortisol levels and thus decreased feeling of stress

• Increased serotonin and thus increase mood state

• Increased management of anxiety

 

So when you have a moment spare try to close your eyes and focus on your breathing, the rhythm of breaths, the movement of your chest, the feeling of your breath in and out of you mouth or nostrils. After a few moments check in with how your feeling.

 

Have you ever heard of BOX BREATHING?

Box breathing is a great way to practice mindful breathing, bring stress levels down and boost relaxation.

It practice Box Breathing all you need to do is:
1. Breathe IN for a 4 count

2. Hold that Inhale for a 4 count

3. Breathe OUT for a 4 count

4. Hold the exhale for a 4 count

Repeat

There are some great apps you can download that help you count and stay in time to practice this – download one and try it out!

Are you getting your recommended 7-8 hours a night of sleep?

If you’re not, then you could be sabotaging yourself greatly.

 

Getting the recommended hours of sleep leads to:

• Increased motivation and concentration, so you’ll want to hop out of bed and head to Peachi at 6am or after work.

• Increased recovery and decreased risk of injury, meaning you can progress in your training goals.

• Increased strength, power, endurance allowing you to push yourself and go hard in your training.

• Immune promoting genes being switched on and inflammation promoting genes being switched off, so you’re body will be fighting fit and ready for whatever challenges you want to try.

 

Do I hear you say yeah that’s all good but How do I get better sleep?

Well you come to Peachi and train so try and think of good sleep requiring training as well.

Here are 2 key factors that you can tinker with:

• Light and temperature dictate sleep, so turn on the aircon or do whatever else will help you be stay cool and invest in a sleep mask to keep the glorious sun from prematurely waking you up.

• Routine and consistency need to be developed so your body gets into a rhythm of when it’s time to produce hormones signalling sleep time. Having a bedtime routine will separate the day from the night, clear your mind and body of the day’s stresses, and relax into sleep.

Contrast showers is the alternating of cold and warm water whilst in the shower. Having your body to adapt to sudden changes in temperature is highly stimulating as it requires a lot of circulatory and metabolic action. This action occurs as the warm water causes vasodilation allowing more blood to flow through your veins and cold water causes vasoconstriction allowing less blood to flow.

Due to these changes in vein dilation your circulatory system gets stronger and reduces the chance of circulatory diseases developing. Increased circulation also assists with the transport of nutrients around your body, the removal of toxins and delivery of oxygen.

As cold water reduces blood flow it also reduces inflammation assisting in the reduced occurrence of muscle soreness.

Cold water showers has been shown to increase activity of natural killer cells and leukocytes that help with fighting pathogens thus boosting immunity.

So… how do you get started?

Start of small with 20-30 seconds of cold water at a time increasing to a 1 minute over a few days or weeks. Depending on the season you might go full cold or have a little bit of water and just feel colder than with your ideal temperature on. Make sure to not hold your breathe and that you breathe through it and try to be as relaxed as possible.

…Also always finish with cold water.

Let us know how you go!

MUSCLE & STRENGTH

All things muscle, injury, training and strength building…

Warm Up sets are sometimes underrated at Peachi because you guys get so excited to get to the heavy stuff! And while we LOVE your enthusiasm, we also want you to start incorporating a more gradual approach to heavy lifting…

Warm Up sets are the sets you do prior to your work sets, essentially starting off at a lighter weight to what you’re trying to work at.

The benefits of warm up sets include:

• Allowing your body and muscles temperature to increase and literally warm up and be ready

• Increase blood flow and oxygen delivery to muscles so can do the movement efficiently

• Increased mobility and flexibility so you can do the movement in full range

• Ensure you’re mentally prepared by getting your confidence up and having your breathing and movement well-rehearsed

• Reduce your risk of injury as you are fully prepped to push your body.

 

So let’s get on this immediately! Do a lighter set before you power into a challenging weight team 😉

NEED HELP?

The Coaching Team is always here to answer your questions and support you however you need to ensure you’re getting the most out of ELEVATE 24.

Please text or call Kim on 0433 719 354 or email info@peachipt.com.au and we’ll get things sorted ?

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